melkbus-cheeses

Say Cheese

Cheese is one of the greatest creations on this earth. From raw to pasteurized, creamy to crumbly, stretched to molded; there are many varieties of cheeses from all types of animals like sheep, cow, goat, etc. Unfortunately, people are starting to forget the difference in quality of these dairy masterpieces. For instance, Parmesan is NOT Parmigiano Reggiano, not all Pecorino Romano is actually from Rome, and no cheese made in Wisconsin is ever a replacement for the real thing.

We carry a wide variety of specialty cheeses for every occasion from international cheeses to domestic. We love is the ability to carry these great items and show people, who may have forgotten, what the difference is between our cheese case, and the “grab and go” sections at most eateries.

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Cypress Grove

Keep an eye on the creamy ridge just under the rind...that’s the proteolysis. As soft-ripened or “bloomy rind” cheeses mature, the proteolysis gets wider and more gooey.

Flavor: Fresh cream with a crisp citrus tang
Aroma: Buttermilk and fresh cream
Visual Cues: Bloom and rind are very white, proteolysis up to a quarter • inch thick, cheese texture is firm and moist

As the proteolysis widens and becomes more luscious, a process known as lipolysis simultaneously occurs. Lipolysis is responsible for aroma and flavor.

Flavor: Tangy, hints of floral and herb
Aroma: Buttermilk and floral
Visual Cues: Slight darkening of the rind, proteolysis is up to one-half inch thick, and cheese texture is slightly drier and flaky.

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Portuguese cheese

Although Portugal’s most famous contribution to food and drink is undoubtedly Port wine, its superb range of artisan cheeses, with their lengthy pedigree and traditions are equally a worthy addition to any gourmet’s household.

And while most visitors to this beautiful and historic country may well only bring home a bottle or two of Port, or possibly a table wine from the famed Alentejo region, they would do well to perhaps remember the delicious cheeses from the Serra de Estrela Mountains or the pungent Serpa cheese from southern Portugal. Indeed, although countries like France and Italy have a stronger association with high-quality cheese production, you would do well to explore what Portugal can offer you. It may have some nice surprises in store.


 

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Cow Cheese

I love cheese. I love nibbling on it with a glass of wine, shredding fine slivers of it over salads or making cheese platters.

When you walk into most grocery stores, the vast majority of items in the cheese aisle hardly resemble traditional cheeses anymore. The choices can be daunting, particularly if you want to buy the most nourishing cheese you can for you and your family. Besides taste, what’s the difference between that expensive, imported cheese and the discount block of American or Colby Jack? A lot.

Sadly, the state of cheese in the U.S. is deeply disturbing. Whether it’s our acceptance of oddities like Velveeta, or the ever-pervasive “American” cheese — both of which can’t even legally be called “cheese” (even given our lax labeling standards!) and instead are labeled as “cheese products.”

Because cheese is made from milk, many of the principles you’d apply to choosing the healthiest milk can be used to pick the healthiest cheeses.

What to Buy

Basically, we’re trying to find REAL cheese — cheese that’s as traditional and natural as possible, the kind of cheese your ancestors have been eating for thousands of years.

BEST CHOICE: Raw cheeses from grass-fed cows producing milk high in A2 beta casein and relatively low in A1 beta casein — that means milk from Jerseys, Guernseys, and other traditional cattle breeds rather than newer Holsteins.

Finding these in your grocery store can be tough, but we at Gourmets On Wheels carry 100% grass fed cow milk cheeses.  Imported European cheeses are a great place to start. Europeans don’t treat their dairy cows with growth hormones, and they also know that the best tasting cheeses are the ones coming from cows eating lush green grass. You can tell if a cheese is made with raw milk by reading the ingredients label.

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Goat Cheese

Goats were some of the first domesticated animals, thus the art of making goat cheese has a very long history. Today goat cheese remains a staple of the Mediterranean diet, while North America furthers the tradition by producing an abundance of fabulous goat cheeses of its own. Many come from cherished, small, local producers with unique regional flavors. Others are from renowned cheese makers who have won international awards for their creations.

Our best seller in the Goat department is Humboldt Fog.

Young Humboldt Fog
 
We sell Humboldt Fog year round and you can request three flavor/ripening profiles.

Keep an eye on the creamy ridge just under the rind...that’s the proteolysis. As soft-ripened or “bloomy rind” cheeses mature, the proteolysis gets wider and more gooey.

Flavor: Fresh cream with a crisp citrus tang.
Aroma: Buttermilk and fresh cream.
Visual Cues: Bloom and rind are very white, proteolysis up to a quarter • inch thick, cheese texture is firm and moist.

Ripe Humboldt Fog

As the proteolysis widens and becomes more luscious, a process known as lipolysis simultaneously occurs. Lipolysis is responsible for aroma and flavor.

Flavor: Tangy, hints of floral and herb.
Aroma: Buttermilk and floral.
Visual Cues: Slight darkening of the rind, proteolysis is up to one-half inch thick, and cheese texture is slightly drier and flaky.

Mature Humboldt Fog

Proteolysis and lipolysis have taken over...look at all that ooey-gooey goodness!
Flavor: Tart tone with pronounced herbaceous and earthy notes.
Aroma: Hints of ammonia until aired out, then strong herb and rind fragrances.
Visual Cues: Marbled rind, proteolysis, up to an inch thick, cheese texture is more dry.

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Sheep cheese

Domesticated sheep have been around for longer than the domesticated cow. The first records of cheese coincide with the domestication of sheep. Historically speaking, sheep’s milk cheese is more authentic than our familiar cow’s milk cheese.

Sheep milk has nearly twice the solids (fat and protein) of cow or goat milk. Regardless of a sheep cheese's texture, you can feel the fat in these guys. Opulent and often tangy, sheep cheeses range from subtle and approachable, with an undercurrent of sweetness, to tart and briny. Sheep milk is highly nutritious, It has a slightly sweet taste and is high in calcium and zinc. it’s richer in vitamins A, B, and E, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and magnesium than cow's milk. It contains a higher proportion of short- and medium-chain fatty acids, which have recognized health benefits.

Sheep cheese can fall into many different categories, such as fresh, soft, veined and pressed, so the selection is incredibly varied. The more traditional sheep cheeses hail from Spain and Portugal (dry mountain regions), but also from Greece where Feta is wildly popular. Discover them all below.

Most of the sheep milk produced in the world is made into cheese. Some of the most famous cheeses are made from sheep milk: Feta (Greece, Italy, and France), Ricotta and Pecorino Romano (Italy) and Roquefort (France). The U.S. is a large importer of sheep milk cheeses. Sheep milk is also made into yogurt and ice cream.

In ancient times, cheese was made primarily from sheep's milk, notes University of Maryland sheep and goat specialist Susan Schoenian. Sheep's milk is sweeter than cow's milk and produces a cheese that contains more fat, protein and calcium per serving than cheese prepared from cow's milk. The most popular type of sheep's milk cheese in the United States is Pecorino Romano, a hard cheese made in Italy. You can use it on pasta, vegetables or bread as a substitute for grated Parmigiano Reggiano.